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Simian Rex
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Discussion Starter #21
  1. Longer than the stock dampers would last with stock springs.
  2. Adjustability, pure and simple.
The math is simple; a softer spring means that the damper doesn't work as hard to do the same job, thus lasting longer. If you have to ask why you need coilover springs, you clearly don't need them. Necessity is the Mother of Invention, they say? Coilovers are a lot more expensive, and only worth the expense in a handful of situations.
 

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Simian Rex
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Discussion Starter #23
It wasn't written for you, oh, Omniscient-Yet-Spacey One.
 

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Claps of approval!

Good job CowboyDren, I actualy feel smart. The writing was useful, informative and entertaining.

Someone needs to do a website with pictures of the three hundred pound guy riding his unicycle, then we can ad it to the FAQ section!

That explains the rates and dampening of the stock Spec-v and SE but what about G/XE rates? What kind or spring rate do we have. See I understand!
 

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CowboyDren said:
  1. Longer than the stock dampers would last with stock springs.
  2. Adjustability, pure and simple.
The math is simple; a softer spring means that the damper doesn't work as hard to do the same job, thus lasting longer.
Why am I confused.....you would think with a softer spring....the car would oscillate more over bumps....thereby making the dampers work harder to control that "bounce" to bring the spring back to its normal state.......

This is what you originally posted....
"The damper's job is to keep the spring under control when oscillation occurs. It does this by resisting acceleration of the spring, be it compression or rebound (jounce)."

I would think a stiffer spring would undergo less tension/compression than the softer sprngs...thus relieving some of the dampers work....

I look at the extreme.....a spring thats completely solid....no flex what so ever....then dampers wouldnt be doing anything...just hangin out.....conversly...a super soft spring, bouncing/oscillating/wish washy all over the place....now the dampers are going nuts trying to control that.....

I dont know....just curious why i cant get this through my thick skull! :)
Maybe there are some other things I am leaving out in my own little theory.... :)
 

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mcampo said:


Why am I confused.....you would think with a softer spring....the car would oscillate more over bumps....thereby making the dampers work harder to control that "bounce" to bring the spring back to its normal state.......

This is what you originally posted....
"The damper's job is to keep the spring under control when oscillation occurs. It does this by resisting acceleration of the spring, be it compression or rebound (jounce)."

I would think a stiffer spring would undergo less tension/compression than the softer sprngs...thus relieving some of the dampers work....

I look at the extreme.....a spring thats completely solid....no flex what so ever....then dampers wouldnt be doing anything...just hangin out.....conversly...a super soft spring, bouncing/oscillating/wish washy all over the place....now the dampers are going nuts trying to control that.....

I dont know....just curious why i cant get this through my thick skull! :)
Maybe there are some other things I am leaving out in my own little theory.... :)
While you are correct in some areas, some of it is pretty wrong too. The main logic behind that is this, a stronger spring, while it wont compress as much going over bumps will be much harder to control because its just that, harder and stronger, so it takes more force to stop it. A softer spring will move more at first but it is much easier to keep it from moving because it is much weaker, so it takes less force to stop it. I will attemp to explain with symbols but if I fail miserably just ignore me, lol. Imagine your hand being the damper and a dog's tail being the soft spring. It moves quite a bit but if you grab it, it is pretty easy to stop. Now a hard spring is like a vibrating engine, while it is not moving much it is very very hard to keep it from vibrating with just your hands because it is so strong.
 

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That makes sense.....I guess that was the part of my own theory that i left out....:) thanks bro :)
 

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Why do Aftermarket Springs have low rates?

I know that there have been posts about the factory spring rates for other cars, but not for GXE. Are GXE springs stiffer than say Progress Springs? I'm just had the impression here that factory springs for SpecV for example are stiffer than what's available in the aftermarket.

Why do companies such as Progress make springs that have lower rates than the ones for SpecV for example.

Do these companies such as Eibach test their springs with factory dampers? How do these companies know what rates tuners want or say the majority of owners want for their cars?

Are these performance springs or what? or is it cheaper to produce lower spring rates and don't release the rates, steal people's money and we found out the hard way that these springs suck.

I don't know why these companies don't make dampers to match their springs. I think it just makes sense don't you.
 

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Alright, alright.. some of us really like the harsh springs in their SpecVs... The big question is where can we get appropriate dampers for them?

I've started to look but haven't had much luck. I don't really want to lower the car, like the spring rates, and need dampers... Why is life so hard?!?

/
 

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Simian Rex
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Discussion Starter #34
Kimchee76 said:
Why do Aftermarket Springs have low rates?
They don't. Read the numbers again. Chimmike is spot-on with his ascertation. I can't spell that word, so I probably shouldn't use it, huh?
Tweeek said:
Alright, alright.. some of us really like the harsh springs in their SpecVs... The big question is where can we get appropriate dampers for them?
We can't. Period. If you want better dampers, you have to get a different spring configuration, namely a coilover system.
 

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Faster than you..
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Im still confused

So.. I want to lower my car.. i dont feel like spending 1k+ on a full true coilover system. I dont see myself adjusting the ride height all the time so i dont think i need the grounc control "coilovers"

Here's my question.. If i put progress springs on my spec-v what are the cons and what are the pros?

If i understand the post correctly, the progress springs on a spec-v will not wear out the other suspension components prematurely..
 

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agreed, and curious still. I'd like the small drop, want roughly the same spring rates, and about 1" or so of drop.

Are the progress springs the way to go? Does anyone know the "actual" spring rates of these compared to the Spec's.?

Thanks in advance all that know!
 

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Simian Rex
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Discussion Starter #37
The rates of the Progress springs (which are about 1.5-1.7" lower than stock) are 190/240 vs. Spec-V springs at 325/375. Just because you don't need adjustability doesn't mean coilovers are a waste of money. It's all about meeting goals, and if a low budget is one of those goals, you have to stop bitching about the rest of the goals that aren't being met.
 

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CowboyDren said:
The rates of the Progress springs (which are about 1.5-1.7" lower than stock) are 190/240 vs. Spec-V springs at 325/375. Just because you don't need adjustability doesn't mean coilovers are a waste of money. It's all about meeting goals, and if a low budget is one of those goals, you have to stop bitching about the rest of the goals that aren't being met.
Umm ok :)

I just wanna lower the car for cosmetic purposes really.. but if it's gonna have any overly adverse effects i dont wanna do it..

Would you reccomend the progress springs for just cosmetic purposes? They wont make the ride terribly unbearable or otherwise mess other stuff up will they?
 

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Simian Rex
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Discussion Starter #39
If you'd actually read my article that started this three-page thread, you'd understand that the Progress springs are excellent for cosmetics and they're actually better for the ride quality of a Spec-V. You will also experience longer damper life. The only negative is that if you're going to DEs, the car will handle differently. I'm willing to bet, though, that the lower CoG combined with the better effectiveness of the dampers would let you keep the car almost as fast as a stocker. If you don't understand what I just said, then you won't notice any difference at all except for the better ride.

Get them. I've seen them for $130 in several places, and they're absolutely worth every penny.
 

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Immature Tough Guy
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CowboyDren said:
Spec-V springs at 325/375
Dren, what are your comments on Eibach's recent specv spring rate test? They claim 150f/240r, which was confirmed by cortrim1, who works in a calibration lab down in Charleston. He tested 12 month old stock spec springs and got 150f/236r.

Sounds like a much more realistic rate to me. This also validates Progress' claims that their spring rates (190f/240r) are higher than stock (well, at least in the front).
 
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