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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a GXE so I was wondering if these brake lines would work for my car. Also how do you install them and what are the benefits to having them?
 

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Well you get alot better of a braking response with the Stainless Steel brake lines due to the fact that they don't flex at all like the traditional stock ones do.....
But the installation of them aren't to bad at all it just reguires that you bleed the braking system...But I'm sure if you don't feel comfortable with doing the install yourself I'm sure a local garage will do it for ya....

But as far as fitting your car I'm not sure if they would fit you'll have to look into that or maybe someone else can tell ya....
 

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yes they will fit
i can get them for any sentra model specific, 200sx, pulsar, or nx model
installation is simple, mike kojima has a great writeup in the sentra.net tech section on brakes, i suggest you read into it. bleeding brake lines sounds hard but it's fairly simple, you open the brake valve, someone in the car presses the brakes down, brake bleeds, you close th evalve, person in the car releases the pedal, then you open the valve, person in the car depresses pedal slowly. etc. etc. etc. it's simple
this is a great offer, it's about 1/2 off the retail price
if yo'ure gonna jump in do it soon!
 

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not much of a diff. i installed the stllen brake lines with the stillen metal matrix pads all around. the pedal feels the same as stock, but the higher speed, i feel a better grip on the pads to the stock orotrs. other then that, not worth spending top dollars.

stick to stock!
 

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Intoxicated said:
I have a GXE so I was wondering if these brake lines would work for my car. Also how do you install them and what are the benefits to having them?
We have a group deal going on:

SMC Stainless Steel Brake Lines Headcount

Lots of people getting in on it, looks like to be a worthwhile mod, especially for the deal we're getting on them. :)
 

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blitztech said:
these are SMC lines not Stillen lines, Steve custom makes them... if you dont feel the difference in your lines, try autocrossing = ]
Plus to add to this my friend has a Civic and I have driven his car plenty of times before he installed his SS brake lines and after he put them on and I noticed a big difference....
 

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I posted this in the group buy section and figured it might help here as well...


Braided lines help pedal feel and brake modulation. Unlike the stock rubber hose, they do not expand with internal pressure. Braided lines help make sure that all the pedal force gets to the caliper. I think that the pedal gets significantly firmer and modulation improves. Some companies claim big decreases in stopping distances with braided lines but I am a bit skeptical of their claims. Not all braided lines are DOT approved. Although much stronger than stock rubber hoses, braided hoses usually fail the DOT whip test. This is when the hoses are attached to a drill motor like fixture and spun at high rpm for x hours. The steel fatigues and the lines fail in this sort of test. Since this has very little bearing on actual stresses while installed in a car, I myself am not to concerned if a braided line does not have DOT approval. DOT hoses have a little plastic sleeve that keeps the hose from bending as much when spun in the whip test. I doubt that this little piece of plastic makes the line any safer in the real world. Braided hoses have much higher burst strength than rubber hoses and I feel that this is a valid concern. Beware of a heavily advertised brand of hoses that has a colorful plastic cover. These hoses are cheaply priced but are junk. Steve at SMC showed be a set that he bought to check out. With a firm tug, the end fittings could be pulled off by hand!

SMC, Stillen and Goodridge all make good hose kits. SMC uses high quality forged end fittings that are reusable so I myself like them, but they are not DOT approved. Like I said, I don’t think a small plastic sleeve alone makes for a safe brake hose. The Goodridge lines uses swaged fittings. Although both kinds of fittings can work well, I prefer the screw together type that SMC uses myself.

In short, I feel that braided hoses make a big difference in brake feel and being reasonably priced, I think that they are worth it. by Mike Kojima
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well... I'm pretty convinced that getting the lines would be good but what I'm worried about is installation and warranty. How would this affect my warranty and would it be hard to install? I dont want to shell out big bucks to pay a shop to do it.
 

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i am wondering if i get the Disc/disc set, can the line fit into a drum? (because i am not 100% sure if i will change the drum to brake in the future...)
 

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So is there any downside to it?
 

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Okay guys, I would imagine that the warranty would not void, due to the fact that the dealership has to prove that the modified part actually caused the malfunction.

As far as the installation, I believe it isn't hard, except for the part where you'll have to bleed the brakes. There's some installation procedures somewhere...try The Sentra Network
 

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whitesentra said:
So is there any downside to it?
I haven't really heard of anything yet...And people who own muscle cars and race cars have been using them for many years now,,so that's gotta say something....
 

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Original Mr Sentra said:
Okay guys, I would imagine that the warranty would not void, due to the fact that the dealership has to prove that the modified part actually caused the malfunction.

As far as the installation, I believe it isn't hard, except for the part where you'll have to bleed the brakes. There's some installation procedures somewhere...try The Sentra Network
Like Marvin said the install isn't hard at all,,,,Just look threw your wheels and you'll see the calipers and drums (if you have them)and you'll see the rubber brake lines,,,now all you do is loosen the fitting and screww the stainless steel fitting on and bleed your system...But here's what Sentra.net has for brake bleeding procedure..

COURTESY OF SENTRA.NET

The following is based on recommendations made by brake guru Mac Tilton. Mac is best known as the man that brought Carbon pads and rotors to racing. He is also the owner of Tilton Engineering; one of the main suppliers of brakes and clutches to Indy and F-1. I have added some things based on my own experiences also.

When bleeding brakes it is best to manually bleed them as pressure bleeders can cause cavitation and bubbles inside the system. Empty the brake reservoir with a turkey baster then fill the reservoir with a high quality brake fluid. Start bleeding at the furthest wheel away from the M/C and progress to the closest. So that would go RR, LR, RF, LF. Attach a length of clear Tigon tubing (available form any auto parts store) to the bleeder nipple, put the other end of the line into some sort of container so the other end will be submerged in brake fluid and open the nipple. Have someone in the car to pump the brakes. Slowly pump all of the old fluid out of the line until new clear fluid comes out, then have the person in the car hold the pedal down while you close the bleeder. Have the person lift the pedal up slowly and then push down slowly while you open the nipple. You have to communicate with the pumper because the bleeder should only be open on the down stroke of the brake pedal. It is important to pump slowly to avoid bubble-forming cavitation. Continue to pump until you cannot observe any bubbles in the clear Tigon tube.

Get a rubber mallet and tap the caliper to dislodge any bubbles that may be stuck inside the caliper and bleed some more until no more bubbles come out. Do this at all the wheels and you are done. Be careful not to let the reservoir run dry or you will have to start all over. On ABS equipped cars you want to be extra careful about this because it takes forever and a lot of fluid to bleed a completely dry ABS system. Some ABS cars require bleeding from nipples on the ABS modulator so check your manual.



You can read the entire brake section from the Sentra Dot Net by clicking this link below.
http://www.sentra.net/tech/brake_modifications.shtml
 

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whitesentra said:
So is there any downside to it?
Heh..don't think I could add anymore to this topic already, but another way of thinking of it is like stainless steel is very durable and definitely keeps from expanding, unlike rubber brake lines. No real downside, other than the installation, but it's worth it. :)
 

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Lee said:
whitesentra said:
So is there any downside to it?
after over a year using them, i have had no ill effects from this install.
Damn it Lee I totaly forgot you had them....my bad:)
 
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