Reduced tolerance to cold weather in warm climates.. [Archive] - B15sentra.net - Nissan Sentra Forum

: Reduced tolerance to cold weather in warm climates..


Muhammad
09-01-2006, 08:26 AM
So I was talking to a few of my co-workers about how people in living in warm climates have a lower tolerance for cold temperatures and how I thought it was mostly just a mental thing. And they both were convinced it had to do with your blood being thinner after prolonged periods in warmer climates, but how does that make logical sense? I googled it but couldn't come up with anything.

chimmike
09-01-2006, 08:28 AM
i doubt it has anything to do with anything other than mental perception.

I love cold weather, and I've lived in FL for 24 years.

pugnex
09-01-2006, 08:29 AM
I'd say it's a biological/evolution thing.

Lee
09-01-2006, 08:31 AM
It's called acclimation and adaption. when you get acclimated or used to a certain temp or ecology, your body adjusts itself to its surroundings. If the ecosystem changes rapidly, your body will need time to adjust.

Petro
09-01-2006, 08:34 AM
the very reason why all my black friends are always moistureizing every 3 minutes in the winter.
and I get sun Burned on my nose and shoulders

Muhammad
09-01-2006, 08:35 AM
I'd say it's a biological/evolution thing.


The example a coworker used was that he was from Minnesota (and was used to freezing temps) and he was stationed in Hawaii for a 2 year period were he would get really sensitive to a drop in temp to the 50s, he attributed it to "thinning of the blood" and my other coworker agreed.

SR20dee
09-01-2006, 08:37 AM
that would like explain why i hate Connecticut so much lol..

(ive lived in the southern us and hawaii for 75% of my life.. )

Lee
09-01-2006, 08:41 AM
No, I do not believe the physical make-up of the blood changes. That is an old wives tale. Acclimation is the answer.

Think about it...Hawaiii for 2 years. The average temp there is what? 85*F? Humidity is prolly pretty much lateral year around. when winter comes to humid areas, the cold feels colder due to the moisture in the air. 50* is not the "same" everywhere. You have baromtetric pressure, humidity and other factor to consider.

also, if you lose weight quickly and drop a good amount of body fat, that also makes you more succeptable to oversensitivty of climate changes because you do not have as much "insulation" regulating your body temp.

Maybe Maxx can chime in. he lived in HI for awhile. He also came to see me in FLA from CO, in the winter, and he can attest to the fact that 50* in FL is not the same as 50* in CO. I've been to AZ and up the eastern coast and the same temp feels different due to weather variables.

...but it's still acclimation. :D

serag
09-01-2006, 08:44 AM
The example a coworker used was that he was from Minnesota (and was used to freezing temps) and he was stationed in Hawaii for a 2 year period were he would get really sensitive to a drop in temp to the 50s, he attributed it to "thinning of the blood" and my other coworker agreed.
no, it's exactly what Lee posted above. Your co-worker just got "used" to being in a much warmer enviroment. People that live in northern climates go through the same thing in the summer/fall, when temps start getting lower, especially at night.

Muhammad
09-01-2006, 08:46 AM
See Lee,

That (your explanation) all makes sense to me, I wonder WTF logic is in the cold/warm blood thing. It seems they think that thick blood retains heat better than thin blood.

Lee
09-01-2006, 08:53 AM
If your blood changes consistency like that, they need to be check for anemia(possibly sickle cell) or leukemia. (or dillusions of grandeur)

It's one of those things that are embedded into our minds from when we were little. Just like:
- Don't go to bed with wet hair. you can catch a cold.
- Don't do that! you will get hairy palms.
- Chewing gum stays in your body 7 years if you swallow it
_ pop rocks and soda will make you explode

Muhammad
09-01-2006, 09:03 AM
If your blood changes consistency like that, they need to be check for anemia(possibly sickle cell) or leukemia. (or dillusions of grandeur)

It's one of those things that are embedded into our minds from when we were little. Just like:
- Don't go to bed with wet hair. you can catch a cold.
- Don't do that! you will get hairy palms.
- Chewing gum stays in your body 7 years if you swallow it
_ pop rocks and soda will make you explode


Pretty much, another one the same coworker threw out was kids get diarrhea when they teeth due to the fact that they ingest blood, which I know isnt true.

Muhammad
09-01-2006, 09:17 AM
My boyfriend is from Canada and he claims that when people move from a cold climate to a warm climate their blood gets thinner. I think he's wrong. Who's right?
-- Theresa, North Park

Hmmmm. So if you cut yourself in Alaska your blood sort of globs out like toothpaste, and if you're the Caribbean, it flows like water? No, I don't think so. But blood is one of the major parts of our thermoregulation system. In cold weather, capillaries near the surface of the skin contract to force blood deeper into the body to keep its core temperature high enough. In hot weather, blood is forced into those capillaries so heat can be radiated from the blood through the skin to keep the core temperature down. A Canada-to-California move requires your vascular system to adjust to continual warm weather. Usually within a few weeks or a few months, your heat-radiating system works very efficiently. But when you go back to Canada for Christmas, you're more sensitive to the cold than you were when you left because your vascular system can't adjust as quickly as it once did to compensate for the cold. Again, it takes weeks or months to reacclimatize.
A change in climate causes temporary changes in your blood pressure, metabolism rate, oxygen requirements, and sweating and can even affect your immunity to illness. There are psychological changes as well. Cold climates with frequent weather fronts are more stressful for people (some call it invigorating). Warm climates seem to induce a more laid-back attitude, partly because strenuous physical activity raises your core body temperature, potentially dangerous.

Your boyfriend is right about his newly developed sensitivity to cold. But his bloods no thinner than it was in Canada, unless he lived on some high mountain. People who live at altitude have more oxygen-carrying red blood cells than those of us closer to sea level to help them compensate for the reduced oxygen in the atmosphere. So you might say their blood is "thicker," with a higher blood cell-to-plasma ratio than average. But that wouldn't affect sensitivity to cold, in any event.

SR20dee
09-01-2006, 09:23 AM
**** this.. im moving back to hawaii LOL.. that last thing explained alot :p

SE-Mark
09-01-2006, 09:26 AM
Thick and thin blood is an expression. Nothing more.

Paraskass
09-01-2006, 09:39 AM
i doubt it has anything to do with anything other than mental perception.

I love cold weather, and I've lived in FL for 24 years.

what do you consider cold?

Cold is when your snot freezes inside your nose.

Try -30 degrees for 20 days in a row and let me know if you like the cold.

suckmynissan
09-01-2006, 10:32 AM
I dont travel outside of AZ in the winter time unless its totally necessary. BLAH!! I live here for a reason.

SR20dee
09-01-2006, 10:37 AM
what do you consider cold?

Cold is when your snot freezes inside your nose.

Try -30 degrees for 20 days in a row and let me know if you like the cold.


people in florida put a parka on when its 50 outside..

I'm standing around in a tshirt when its that cold :p

nemui_panda
09-01-2006, 11:38 AM
So I was talking to a few of my co-workers about how people in living in warm climates have a lower tolerance for cold temperatures and how I thought it was mostly just a mental thing. And they both were convinced it had to do with your blood being thinner after prolonged periods in warmer climates, but how does that make logical sense? I googled it but couldn't come up with anything.
I think it's all in your head. But I hate the cold. Screw winter.

buckswife
09-04-2006, 09:41 PM
I dislike heat and cold. I can't adjust very well at all to changes either way. And in Missouri, no telling what the weather will be in 5 minutes, let alone a day. Poor circulation is most of my problem, I had much better tolerance when I was younger. As I get older and my health gets worse, I can tell its harder to adjust to hot or cold. I especially have a problem with the cold. If I were rich, I would have a winter home down south. Screw Misery (Missouri) and the cold winters! :p

Daemos
09-04-2006, 09:50 PM
It's just your body gets used to it.

Biggest change is the fatty acid composition inside your cells. They change to adapt to the environment.

In my city it goes from -50C (-56F) in winter to almost +40C (104F) in Summer. After the winter, in the spring when the temps are like 10-15C (50-60F) that's like shorts seasons. But when summer hits, and you spend alot of time outside temps of 10-15C arn't quite as warm as they are.

Your body adapts, but it's not rapid adaptation, because chemical changes happen, and those changes don't happen overnight.

I don't know anyone that adapts quickly to temperature changes, like when WINTER first sets, even with winter jackets, it feels cold, but as it gets colder and colder, and your body gets used to it, it feels normal. (do not try this with extreme temperatures, your body will not adapt beyond a certain range, I am not responsible for your safety)

Spec Jay
09-05-2006, 03:29 AM
i lived in hawaii for a year took a vacation back to washington for a few weeks and whining and bit**ing like no tommarow when it was down to 60 degrees

adc100
09-05-2006, 07:07 AM
And in Missouri, no telling what the weather will be in 5 minutes, let alone a day.

My former son-in-law just moved out to Springfield Missouri (Glad your state has him). Hope he enjoys the weather (and stays our there). :)

drgnzadiel101
09-05-2006, 08:38 AM
i doubt it has anything to do with anything other than mental perception.

I love cold weather, and I've lived in FL for 24 years.same here

chillboy
09-05-2006, 09:01 AM
LOL I found this a while back when my dad would complain bitterly about temps while he's back from FL at XMas time. It explains the real reason you feel cold when changing climates.


*****************copied from email, forget the source****

In cold weather, capillaries near the surface of the skin contract to force blood deeper into the body to keep its core temperature high enough. In hot weather, blood is forced into those capillaries so heat can be radiated from the blood through the skin to keep the core temperature down. A Canada-to-California move requires your vascular system to adjust to continual warm weather. Usually within a few weeks or a few months, your heat-radiating system works very efficiently. But when you go back to Canada for Christmas, you're more sensitive to the cold than you were when you left because your vascular system can't adjust as quickly as it once did to compensate for the cold. Again, it takes weeks or months to reacclimatize.

A change in climate causes temporary changes in your blood pressure, metabolism rate, oxygen requirements, and sweating and can even affect your immunity to illness. There are psychological changes as well. Cold climates with frequent weather fronts are more stressful for people (some call it invigorating). Warm climates seem to induce a more laid-back attitude, partly because strenuous physical activity raises your core body temperature, potentially dangerous.

HumboldtBlazer
09-05-2006, 10:50 AM
If it gets to be around 45 or below I start to freeze my a55 off. I have always lived in Cali so I buy into the bood thing.